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Posts Tagged ‘stalybridge in old photographs’

stalybridge history 609

Weavers’ Cottages Cocker Hill, stalybridge

I’ve been fortunate to become friends with Kate at the StalyMag. She asked me to write about the above photo for a new feature in the StalyMag called Past Staly. The photo is predictably of Cocker Hill. I thought it was unusual as it features the Weavers’ Cottages, rather than the Church, which seems to be a feature of most old photos of the area. It may be that the Church had been demolished before the photo was taken.

It was interesting to write for the magazine; what do you write when asked to write a few words about a photo? My initial thoughts were to write about the difference between the archive photo and the current one, but the reality is there aren’t too many differences. The there are more cars now, the windows have changed but thankfully the Cottages still look similar.

CockerHillLikeOldPhotoBut2013

Weavers’ Cottages, Cocker Hill, Stalybridge 2013

The article I wrote is below… What do you think?

This is the first in a new series of archive photos of Stalybridge that we plan to feature over the next couple of months.

The photo is of Cocker Hill, Stalybridge; I’d guess that the picture was taken in the early 1960s.
The Cottages in the centre of the picture are now over 250 years old; we can’t date them exactly but they were first sold in 1750. They were looking over Stalybridge when Stalybridge when Stalybridge contained just 34 houses* and are still there now.

They are known as Weavers Cottages as their owners were wool weavers who worked in their home. The cottages were originally just one room deep with the family generally living and sleeping on the ground floor. Wool was carded and spun on the first floor by the women and children and was woven into cloth by the man of the house using a hand loom on the third floor. There would not have been a bathroom or running water inside the house. The small windows on the top floor of the photo are called mullion windows. The cottages would probably originally have had mullion windows on all levels to allow plenty of light into the cottages to work by.

The house on the far left of the photo was demolished as part of the “post war slum clearance”. The house, and others like it, were replaced by Blandford Court age exclusive accommodation and many of the occupants were rehoused on the Hague Estate by New St Georges Church.

*1795 Census.

Steph

I’ve included a few links below, click through if you want to see more about the occupants of the Cottages or about the domestic production of woollen cloth.

Census returns 25-31 Cocker Hill
Cloth production before the factories

And both the Portland Basin and Saddleworth Museums are also worth a visit if you are in the area.

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When we moved on to Cocker Hill, Stalybridge many years ago people kept telling us “there used to be a church there”  or “The old church fell into the river” etc.  I did a little research and found that they were correct, but there had not been just one church though, there had been three, all built in a similar style. The first was built in 1776. It was the first recorded church in Stalybridge and it did fall down shortly after it was built. The  next church was demolished around a hundred years later because of structural problems and the last church was demolished in the 1960’s as it was no longer used.

The first Church of St. George, Cocker Hill

I have detailed the history of the three churches below; you might need to get a cup tea though I think this is going to be  fairly long post.  The history of the churchyard is interesting too, especially the tales of the body snatchers.

Prior to the building of the Cocker Hill Chapel the people had to walk to either Ashton or Mottram to get to church, not too bad in Summer but it must have been a fairly muddy journey in winter. The church officials in Ashton realised that this was a problem and set about looking for a possible site for a church in Stalybridge.

The site of the church was first sold  on 5 May 1698 for £1001.2s.0d. The site measured three acres of “Cheshire large measure” and was described in the deed as “a chance close, a parcel of land”. Nothing was made of the land at that time.

On 30th June 1774 Lord Stamford agreed with the church Commissioners to allow the land to be used to be used for a church. Money for the building was raised by public subscription and by various grants and gifts.

The church was consecrated in July 1776 as “Chapel of St. George in Staly Bridge within Ridgehill and Lanes in the parish of Ashtonunderlyne”  (Note how Stalybridge was then two words and Ashton Under Lyne was then one.)

The Rev James Wardleworth was appointed as the first vicar in April 1777. The first Baptisms was recorded were held  28 July 1776 and the first burial in the graveyard took place on 16 January 1777.

The next information I can find for the church is a return made by the church to the articles of enquiry of 1778 sent out by the Bishop of Chester. One question asked about the church services. James Wardleworth answered it as follows:- ” My Chapel had ye Misfortune of Tumbling down on Friday 15th May, 1778 and it is uncertain when it will be rebuilt………”

It appears that the church was rebuilt quickly. I can find no record of  the date though. The new church looked very similar to the previous one.

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The second St Georges Church on Cocker Hil

Rev James Wardleworth resigned 4 October 1790 and was succeeded Rev John Robinson on 1 April 1791.

Rev Robinson resigned 9 October 1795 and was succeeded by Rev John Kenworthy 25 September 1796.

John Kenworthy was the vicar for 11 years until he died 13th August 1806.He was just 34 when he died. He was buried in the Cocker Hill churchyard with his wife and Children. The burial records for his family made sad reading. He had a son william who died March 1815 aged 8, a daughter Ellen who died in December 1815 aged 15. His wife Elizabeth died in March 1818 and his other daughter Sarah died in aged just 19 in February 1819.

Rev John Cape Atty was licenced on 11th April 1807.  Cape Atty lived on Cocker Hill, opposite the church. In the returns submitted to the Bishop he describes his house as a substantial stone building, with stable and cow-house on the premises. Also a garden” Cape Atty remained vicar until he died in 1822. His memorial stone remains in the Cocker Hill churchyard.

Rev Isaac Newton France was appointed in 1822. France was previously a curate in Ashton. He was reported as creating sects and divisions throughout the church. Things did not seem to go any better for him in Stalybridge and it was reported that “The Chapel at Cocker Hill under his incumbency was deserted to a great extent”. In the year prior to Newton France’s appointment there were reported to be 450 people in regular attendance.

In 1835 Newton France asked the church’s patron, the Earl of Stamford, to close the existing Chapel, due to its bad repair, and build a new one on a different site. I think he though a bigger newer church would get him a bigger congregation. The Earl agreed and purchased the land on the Hague Stalybridge. The foundation stone was laid for the new church 1st September 1838. The church was completed and consecrated 24 June 1840. The new church was called the church of St George, same name as the Cocker  Hill Chapel as it was the intention that it the new church replaced the old one; however this was not the case.

The new church, known locally as “New” St Georges,  had a capacity of 1,500 people, but with Newton France in charge the congregation was small and it never reached anything near its intended target. Parish records show that the congregation fell as low as six or seven on a regular basis.

Back at the Cocker Hill chapel, known locally as “Old” St Georges, the people were opposed to the idea of closing the church. They petitioned the Bishop to keep the church open and offered to pay for a new vicar to be found. The Bishop gave them permission to make the church safe and good. They did this and even bought a new organ. On the 29th September 1843 Old St Georges re opened with  new vicar Rev William Hall.  The old Church went from strength to strength and the congregation increased back to the 450 it had been in Cape Attys time.

Then in November 1844 Newton France announced that he intended to leave New St Georges and take up possession of Old St Georges on 1 January 1846.

I think that this decision was mainly due to pew rents and endowments. Basically Old St Georges was making more money than New St Georges and Newton France wanted a piece of it. Because of the difficulties with Newton France Hall resigned from Old St Georges in July 1846 and also resigned as a vicar which seems a shame as it sounds like he was a pretty good one.

Things then went from bad to worse. The newspaper reports at the time implied that Newton France was only returning to old St Georges  for financial reasons. He applied to the Church wardens for the keys to the church in August 1846 but his request “was resolutely refused no matter what the consequences”. Newton France then threatened legal proceedings and was told by the Church Wardens that should he insist on returning to the chapel, the congregation would leave and take their organ with them! The Church remained closed. The local MP Mr Tollmache became involved and put the matter before Parliament for debate.There followed a turbulent year with the Churchwarden’s supporters and Newton France’s supporters regularly breaking into the church, changing the locks and taking control of the church.

Newspaper reports at the time suggested that at certain periods on a Sunday in 1847 there were upwards of 2000  people collected in and around the chapel to see what was going on. The week after there were reported to be 3000-4000 people watching to see what would happen next.

By 1849 the church was reported to be very dilapidated, most of the lower windows were broken and the doorway was smashed beyond repair. There did not seem to be any resolution in sight. In May 1850 Isaac Newton France died. A coroners inquest gave a verdict of “death by natural causes”.

Following the death of Newton France the Bishop of Manchester appointed a new vicar at old St Georges, Rev John Leeson. Leeson had taken over new St Georges after Newton France and had grown and gained the respect of the congregation there. The Bishop hoped that he would help heal the problems in old St Georges.

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The Second Old St Georges with surrounding buildings. This photo was taken some time after 1848 when Wakefield Road Baptist Church, the Church on the top left of the picture, was built.

Leeson continued to have many problems with the churchwardens at old St Georges so perhaps all the trouble at old St Georges wasn’t Newton France’s fault. Leeson appeared to deal with them better though and won in the end.  John Leeson continued at old St Georges until his death in August 1867. His memorial in the Cocker Hill churchyard is still visible and says; “This Monument was erected by many friends and is sacred to the memory of John Edmund Leeson who for 16 years was incumbent of this church……”.

Rev John B Jelly Dudley was appointed vicar in 1867 and continued for 34 years until his death in 1904. He was described as a “flamboyant figure with a great sense of humour”

In February 1877  it was reported that an “alarming landslip occurred at old St Georges churchyard” part of the churchyard had collapsed down the hill and exposed  number of coffins. News of the landslip spread rapidly and hundreds of people lined the Stamford Street Bridge to try to see what had happened.

In 1880 and 1881 church records show that “cracks had begun to appear in the south west corner of the building” The cracks got bigger and on 10th July 1882 the church was officially closed for safety reasons.

In 1886 a contract was drawn up to construct a new church on the same site. The new church was octagonal as the previous ones but the roof and windows were different.

The third “old” St. Georges Church, Cocker Hill

The church was re opened in 1888 and was described by the local paper as “an improvement on the old”

In 1904 old St Georges gained a new vicar; Rev Herbert Hampson. He was well liked and introduced both a dramatic society and an athletic society to the church. He continued as  vicar until he died in September 1924. Hampson was succeeded by Rev Frank Augustine Whitehead who was vicar from 1924 to 1937. Whitehead was described as “a great encouragement” and was a supporter of the dramatic society and was the only vicar known to perform in the dramatic productions.

The next vicar was Rev Reginald Hugh Cadman who stayed 7 years and appeared to have a fairly uneventful time at the church.

Cadman was succeeded in 1946 by Rev Charles James Saunders. Tragically Saunders committed suicide two years after taking over the church. Saunders had received the Military Cross for service during the First World War and it was thought that he had suffered from Shell shock. His time at the church was a strange one; not long after he arrived many of the parishioners of the church began to receive defamatory and insulting letters. Though none of the accusations in the letters were true they caused upset in the congregation and the police were called. The police noted that all the letters that had been typed were typed on the vicar’s typewriter and the letter that had been handwritten was in the vicar’s handwriting.

The next vicar was Rev William George McGowan was appointed in 1949. He was a “much loved and admired” vicar but decided to move on after just four years. At that point talk began again of closing old St Georges.

Rev John Penrose was appointed in 1954 and he stayed just three years. The building had fallen into disrepair again and cracks had begun to appear in the North wall. Architects’ reports showed that there were serious problems with the building and that is perhaps one of the reasons why John Penrose left the church.

In 1958 Rev William Radcliffe was appointed vicar and he too stayed just three years.

stalybridge history 552

Third Old St Georges Church in the late 1950s/1960s. Note the cross on the wall which was illuminated at night.

Radcliffe was succeeded in 1962 by the last vicar of old St Georges Rev Micheal Hodge. Hodge remained vicar for five years until the church closure in 1967.  Records show over 150 attended the final service in September 1967 and 80 attended the farewell dinner.

A great deal of effort was extended to try to preserve the building. In 1967 the Stalybridge Civic Society were interested in turning the building into a theatre. The Bishop agreed and said the building would be given as a gift to the town on condition that it would be maintained in a dignified manner. Unfortunately nothing came of this and the building was demolished.

osg-122

Prior to demolition the majority stained glass windows were moved into storage; unfortunately they were later destroyed b a fire. The “Ruth and Naomi” window was moved to Mottram Parish Church. A number of the pews went to Holy Trinity, Bardsley, the Church Bell went to the Church of St Stephen, Astley and the font went to new St Georges in Stalybridge. The wooded reredos  were sold to the Ealing FilmStudios along with one or two pews. The reredos was used on the set of the film “Cromwell” 

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The Cocker Hill churchyard remains today and you can still see the outline of old St Georges and the memorials to Rev Leeson and Rev Cape Atty.

New St Georges continues to be a living church. Website  http://www.stg.org.uk/

Sources

Two into On will Go by Paul Denby ISBN 0 9515993 0 5

Looking back at Stalybridge ISBN  0904506150

Burial Records Old St Georges

If you want to know more I can definitely recommend the book “Two into one will go” by Paul Denby ISBN 0 9515993 0 5. The book has the full history of both churches together with a full chapter on the battle between Isaac Newton France and the ChurchWardens.   There is also an account of the battle between Isaac Newton France and the Churchwardens in the book “Looking back at Stalybridge” Edited by Alice Lock ISBN  0 9515993 0 5.

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Rock Cottage was built prior to 1750 and as such is one of the earliest homes in Stalybridge. Detailed below is a list of the owners from 1750 to 2000.

Pre 1750

Most of the Land in this area was originally owned by the Earl of Stamford however in this case the land appears to have been owned by the Dukinfields.

1750 – Samuel Dukinfield

The earliest reference I can find for the house was 1750 when Samuel Dukinfield sold Rock Cottage and Rock House (then described as “…. a messe & tenement & several closes of land) to Joseph Hall of Cocker Hill in the parish of Ashton Under Lyne. The land was described as part of the Cocker Hill Estate.

1750 – 1764 Joseph Hall

Joseph Hall bought the property in November 1750. He was described as a Clothier. He died in 1764.

In his will Joseph Hall left the cottage to his sons. George Hall Clothier, Joseph Hall Publican and Neddy Shelmerdine Clothier. Why one of Joseph Hall’s son was a Shelmerdine rather than a Hall I don’t know (yet).

1764 – 1804 George Hall, Clothier, Joseph Hall, Publican and Neddy Shelmerdine, Clothier

From the book Stalybridge Pubs 1750-1990 Rob Magee I know that Joseph Hall (publican) was the innkeeper of the Pack Horse Inn, Cocker Hill from 1808 – 1828

Joseph Hall gets a further mention in this blog as it appears could have been a victim of the infamous Body snatchers. I’ve never seen a ghost; I’m not sure if I believe in them anyway; but if I did want to frighten anyone at Halloween I could dim the lights and talk of the body snatchers taking Joseph Hall off to the surgeons in Manchester………

In Bygone Stalybridge by Samuel Hill there is a reference to a Joseph Hall; born 1787 died 1864.  Could he have been a relation to the other Joseph Halls? It describes this Joseph Hall as being connected with the Staly Hunt and describes his burial in the Cocker Hill church yard “attended by upwards of a hundred devout followers of the chase, many of them dressed in their well-worn livery, and attended by their faithful hounds”.  Apparently the sight provided material for a Lancashire sketch entitled “The Huntsman’s Funeral” by Ben Brierey.  Joseph Hall’s gravestone is still in the Churchyard.

Joseph Hall, Huntsman

  1804 – John Hall?

This is where things get confusing…….from an Abstract of title of Thomas Walker 1873 it appears that the property was sold at auction to John Hall for £359. It then looks like John Hall planned to transfer the sale onward to Samuel Gartside (Publican) for £20, however although the £20 was paid it appears that sale did not go through and the property reverted back to previous owners.

Indenture of lease and release dated 15th/16th February 1811 confirms that the sale to Samuel Gartside did not go through & states that the property reverted back to the trustees. (George Hall, Joseph Hall, & Neddy Shelmerdine).

Next it states that James Hall (cotton manufacturer) was a part owner too and that “he produced documents to show that he was the owner of the largest and most profitable lot”.

The indenture then states that the three properties were to be sold to Rev John Cape Atty – Clerk in holy orders for £355.10/.

Rev Cape Atty also paid Samuel Gartside (publican) & Edward Gartside (cotton manufacturer) 5/- a piece to confirm that they had no claim on the land or 3 houses.

1811 – 1822 Rev. John Cape-Atty

Rev Cape Atty was curate of Old St Georges From April 1807 to his death in 1822.

Rev Cape Atty talks of the house in the “Articles of Enquiry” (a questionnaire, completed by Atty, for the Bishop of Chester). In the questionnaire he states “I reside in a house close to the Chapel, which House I bought at some inconvenience, by the Desire of my Congregation, …………………….It is a substantial Stone Building, with a stable and Cow-house on the premises. Also a garden.”  I think that the stable and cow house he refers to is actually Rock Cottage’s kitchen.  The reference to “some inconvenience” over the purchase probably relates to the uncertainty regarding the previous ownership.

Rev. Atty’s will dated 2/3/1818 left Rock Cottage to his sister Sarah, wife of John walker, in trust for her sole use and further trust that it should pass through her will to her kids and grandkids.

John Walker (coal merchant) (Sarah’s son & his nephew) and Ralph Hall (cotton spinner) (Sarah’s son in law) were appointed executors.

Rev John Cape Atty dies and is buried in the Cocker Hill graveyard 20 May 1822.

1822 – 1835 Sarah Walker

Sarah had 3 kids John Walker, Thomas Walker and Elizabeth Hall (wife of Ralph Hall.) Sarah Walker died and was buried on Cocker Hill 22 October 1835. It looks as though she did not make a will leaving the Cocker Hill Houses to her kids – it is not clear what happened next.

I think it was shared between her three children: John Walker (coal merchant), Thomas Walker (coal merchant) and Elizabeth Hall.

1835 – 1853 John Walker (coal merchant), Thomas Walker (coal merchant) and Elizabeth Hall.

Then it looks as though Ralph & Elizabeth Hall sold their share to Edward Appleton. The new owners were presumably John Walker, Thomas Walker and Edward Appleton

John Walker died 9/8/1853 & his will dated 6 May 1951 left an annuity of £500 to Barbara Walker his wife and left his share of the Houses to his brother Thomas Walker (Sarah’s other son possibly) along with other property.

Barbara Walker died 4/5/1872 without children.(buried in Maryport)

1853 – 1873 Thomas Walker – from Maryport in the County of Cumberland

Thomas Walker, Sold both properties at Auction in 1881, by Messrs Henry Heap & Son at Commercial Inn, Stalybridge

1873 – 1881 Thomas Alexander Skirvin Saxon – Manager of A Cotton Mill

Thomas Alexander Skirvin  Saxon bought the cottage at Auction on 19/11/1873 at The Commercial Inn. He  paid for & took ownership on 31 December 1873.

Thomas was married to Harriet Ann Saxon

Thomas is apparently pictured 3rd from the left on the picture below; doesn’t he look smart in his top hat!

Chapel Street Sunday School, built in 1815. From left to right; Allen Wilde, Robert Platt Whitworth, Thomas A. S. Saxon and James Moore (From: ‘United Methodist Centenary Souvenir’, 1915

Thomas Alexander Skirvin Saxon died 24/1/1881

1881 – 1888 Harriet Ann Saxon

Harriet Ann Saxon died 1 February 1888 and left the property to Robert Whitworth Saxon.

1888 – 1929 Robert Whitworth Saxon (Mechanic) & (Mrs) Mary Saxon

Robert Whitworth Saxon died 2 September 1929.

His will was dated 17/March 1914. He appointed his wife Mary as Executor.

1929 – 1936 Mary Saxon

Mary Saxon died 27/02/1936 and left the property to her daughter Harriet Shaw

1936 – 1960 (Mrs) Harriet Shaw

Harriet Shaw died 14/08/1960.

1960 – 1961 Executors of the Estate of Harriet Shaw

1961 – 1982 Noel Backhouse

(Green Grocer) & (Mrs) Elizabeth Backhouse

Noel Backhouse died 14/01/1982

1982 – 1989 (Mrs) Elizabeth Backhouse

Elizabeth Backhouse Sold the property in 1989 and moved into Blandford Court just behind Rock Cottage.

Rock Cottage, July 2009

 

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Listed below are the books about Stalybridge and surrounding areas and/or the Industrial Revolution that I have used for my research.

Two into One Will Go – Paul Denby ISBN 0 9515993 0 5

Two Into One Will Go by Paul Denby is a fantastic book containing the full history of both old and new  St Georges Church Stalybridge. The book is great, it details the history of both churches from the building of the original St Georges Church on Cocker Hill back in 1775 to the amalgamation of both congregations in the 1980’s. It is a fantastic resource for anyone interested in the history of Cocker Hill or Stalybridge in general.

The book is out of print and difficult to obtain nationally, however, the Curate at New St Georges Church has confirmed that they have a number of copies for sale  at £2.95 and he suggested obtaining them from the Church after the Sunday Service at 12.15pm. (The service starts at 10.45  if you want to attend.) Paul Denby has also allowed New St Georges to put a link to his book on their website. Two Into One Will Go – Paul Denby

Stalybridge Pubs 1750 – 1990 – Rob Magee ISBN 1 85216 061 6

This lists all the pubs in Stalybridge, gives a brief history of each pub, and provides a full list of their licensees.

Reminiscences of a Chief Constable – William Chadwick ISBN?

William Chadwick was Chief Constable of Stalybridge 1862 – 1899. I got most of the information for my post on  body  snatching from his book. I can’t find an ISBN for it; the reprint I own was  produced by The Longdendale Amenity Society.

Bygone Stalybridge – Samuel Hill. ISBN?

I love this book. It is a fascinating read about Stalybridge from when records began until 1907 when it was written. It is probably this book that got me most interested in local history. Given that the book is now over 100 years old it is surprisingly easy to read. One of the things I find useful are the list of names the author provides; eg, names of the heads of Stalybridge families, various list of manufacturers, householders, special constables, members of institutions etc. It is great book to have a look at and see if you can find anyone listed you are researching. I can’t find an ISBN for this. The copy I own was published by the author himself; there have been later reprints.

I have just found a website with the full text of Bygone Stalybridge by Sam Hill.

Five Thousand Acres of old Ashton – Winifred Bowman – again no ISBN

No references to Cocker Hill at all which is surprising as it was inside the boundary covered by the book. Cocker Hill was then part of Ridgehill and the Lanes in the Hartshead district. The book goes back to Roman times and has great descriptions of  Parish Councils, the development of the roads, schools and early industries. Great if you are researching Ashton Under Lyne or Tameside in General; less use if you are only looking at Stalybridge.

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The  bridge over the River Tame at Stamford Street, or rather the bridges as there have been at least three, were significant in helping me date pictures of the area.

 I don’t know the date of the first bridge; however I understand there was a bridge prior to 1621 as it appears in a list of bridges in the Macclesfield hundred.  It must have been there some time before that as it was reported as being somewhat in decay at the time. 

The current bridge was built in 1824 and includes the date stone from the 1707 bridge. Not as pretty as the previous one is it?

1707 Bridge

  

1824 Bridge

 

Stamford Street Bridge April 2010

Stamford Street Bridge April 2010

 

Close up of the 1707 date stone

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I loved this poem when I found it; I love that the author, Sam Hill, seems to love the area as much as I do and I love the dialect it is written in. It is thanks to my Grandad that I can understand it all and hearing words like “booside” and “scholars” reminds me so much of him.  I find it best to try to read it aloud and then you can get the sense of it even if you struggle with some of the words. 

Old St Georges, Cocker Hill

 

 The Church is all gone now, but the Churchyard is still there and you can still “linger and wonder and ponder quite fierce” while looking down on Stalybridge. I often do. 

Noan far fro’ this clod ther stands an owd church
Th’ yard wo’s are grown hoary and grey,
Loike a stern sentinel up on his perch
Guardin’ the realms of decay.
I wurn’t yersterday ‘ut th’ foundations wur laid,
Wi’ that bed o’ hard rock for sil;
Theer theawsands o’ th’ owd un’s han’ knelt, sung, an’ prayed,
I’ that Little Reawnd Church up o’ th’ Hill.

Aw’ve known that owd church sin’ fost aw knew owt;
Within th’ seawnd of it bell aw wur born;
As a lad, aw’ve climbed th’ wo; carin for nowt,
T read th’ owd inscriptions so worn.
When th’ gates han’ been fast, an nob’dy’s bin nee,
When th’ booside’s bin quiet an’ still,
Aw’ve linger’t, and ponder’t, and wonder’t, quite frce,
By that Little Reawnd Church up o’ th’ Hill.

Ther’s lots o’ owd folk at aw knew sleepin’ theer,
‘ Neath th’ shadow o’ th’ sacred owd pile;
Ther’n restin’ till doom’s-day, witheaut any fear;
Ther’s some on’em rested a while.
Ther waitin’ till th’ day when ther’ll be a big sheawt,
When Gabriel’s trumpet shall trill  -,
That reckonin’ – day ‘ut they tell’n us abeaut
I’ that Little Reawnd Church up o’ th’ Hill.

Th’ owd shepherd, ut watches o’er th’ flock ‘ut goes theer,
Aw’ve known him o’ th’ days o’ mi life,
Loike an old pilot, his boat he can steer –
It’s seldom ther’s bother or strife.
He’s noan quite as nimble as he’d use’t to be,
But he goes to his work wi a will;
Long may his owd face be seen beamin’ an free,
I’ that Little Reawnd Church up o’ th’ Hill.

Every Whit-Friday aw look for th’ owd brid
When aw goo watchin’ th’ scholars I’ th’ teawn;
He’s one o’ th’ old stagers, fast nearin’ “the strid” –
Th’ owd mower keeps switchin’ um deawn.
Aw loike watchin’ th’ scholars, ther’s no deaubt o’ that;
Sweet feelin’s it seems to instil,
For it’s grand just to see ‘um com’ marchin’ full bat
Fro’ that little Reawnd Church up o’ th’ Hill.

Aw conno’ do mich wi’ a romancing tale,
An’ yo’ munna’ be hard on mi rhyme;
Aw loike for t’ yer those ‘ut weather ‘t loife’s gale
Tell things ‘ut  wur wanst on a time.
Aw’m preawd o’ th’ owd landmark, it’s seldom aw miss
To let my porr een ha’ ther fill –
Aw look up fro’ th’ bridge, wi’ a feelin o bliss,
At that little Reawnd Church up o’ th’ Hill.

 

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