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Posts Tagged ‘Stalybridge’

Well,  to be more precise my husband bought me a picture. I turn 40 later this month and am finding it fairly easy to suggest just one more present……….thanks Al. I love you.        

Normally I wouldn’t add personal stuff to this Cocker Hill blog; but in this case I have a good excuse as the picture is a view from the Cocker Hill Churchyard, looking North East, towards St Paul’s Church, Stalybridge. The building in the foreground was Stokes’ Mill. It is now apartments. 

The picture is what I consider to be my view, the one I look at with my coffee after the school run in the morning. Most other people look up a the hills or down onto the town centre, but I look down and across the river………So when I saw the painting I had to have it.       

       

A Light Snow - Sheila Vaughan

 

 If you want to see more of Sheila’s Stalybridge paintings you can see photos of them on her blog.

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 The Churchyard on Cocker Hill has seen some changes in the almost 250 years it has been looking down on Stalybridge. Three Churches have come and gone on the site and there have been a number of fairly serious landslips.     

Looking at the graves and reading the inscriptions is interesting too. Some are just so sad;  for example in the one shown below for John and Peggy Kershaw you can see in the high infant mortality in the area only too easily. Their first child, Matty died in April 1800 aged 2 years, Mary died in May 1803 aged 4 weeks, Daniel died in june 1804 aged 9 weeks, Jno Hiram died in August 1807 aged 4 weeks, Nathaniel died in January 1811 aged 3 weeks, Margaret died in January 1812 aged 48 weeks and James died in February 1813 aged 7 weeks. John Kershaw died himself in 1821 aged 48 and Peggy died in 1841 aged 68. John was the Sexton at the Cocker Hill Chapel. There are many other memorials with similarly sad stories to tell.         

John and Peggy Kershaw and their Children

 

 Then there are other Gravestones that the “tourists” like to come and see in their groups on summer evenings like the one for Neddy Hall, owner of the first steam-powered Cotton Mills in the area. Neddy’s Mill was known as “Sootpoke Mill”         

There is a full list of all the gravestones and their inscriptions on the New St Georges Church Website.       

The Church and Churchyard were the first in Stalybridge. Built in 1776         

The land that the Church and Churchyard were built upon was originally owned by the Earl of Stamford. It was first conveyed in 1698 and was described in the deed as “a chance close, a parcel of land”  It is recorded that nothing was made of the land at the time. As the population of Stalybridge grew the need for a Church in Stalybridge  increased . The first Church was built on the site in 1776 and was consecrated as the “Chapel of St George in Staley Bridge within Ridgehill and the Lanes in the Parish of Ashton Under Lyne”.          

The first recorded Burial in the Churchyard was 16 January 1777.         

In a “return”  to the Bishop in 1821  the vicar the graveyard as described as being small-quite full and was kept in good order by allowing sheep to graze upon it.  Tameside council now keep the graveyard in good order with regular mowing, but it is not unknown for sheep to graze on it even now.  In the early hours of the morning a few years ago a neighbour of mine saw a small flock of sheep quietly grazing there……….we initially thought she was seeing things but it was a true a local sheep farmer had brought the sheep to graze on churchyard when his own grass was worn out.         

In the book Bygone Stalybridge there is an account of the funeral of  Joseph Hall of  Stalybridge. It describes  Joseph Hall as being connected with the Staly Hunt and describes his burial in the Cocker Hill church yard “attended by upwards of a hundred devout followers of the chase, many of them dressed in their well-worn livery, and attended by their faithful hounds”.  Apparently the sight provided material for a Lancashire sketch entitled “The Huntsman’s Funeral” by Ben Brierey.   

In February 1877 there was the first of two major landslips from the churchyard. Described as an “Alarming incident”. A section of the graveyard had collapsed onto the road below. An investigation by the police and the vicar showed that five or six coffins had fallen with the soil. The particular corner of the graveyard that fell was mainly used for the interment of still born children and it was these coffins that had fallen. Also when the work men began to sort through the debris it became clear that there appeared to have also been a number of  unofficial burials of still-born babies in addition to those in the Church records. Infant mortality was high in those days and many people could not afford to have their children buried. News of the landslip spread rapidly and by the early hours hundreds of people were viewing the scene and were reported to be “lining the bridge and adjoining places eager to get a view of all that had gone on.” The photo below shows the church and churchyard and the bridge where the crowds stood to see what was going on.         

Old St Georges Church and Churchyard.

 

 In 1968 the Church was demolished and in 1972 the churchyard was remodeled and landscaped  with new trees planted. This apparently made it easy to cut the grass and keep it tidy. I understand that it was at this time that the gravestones were moved into the positions they are now in forming steps down into Stalybridge.        

Cocker Hill Churchyard May 2010; The Gravestone Steps

 

A number of the past vicar’s from old St Georges had memorials in the Churchyard. The memorials for Rev Cape Atty and Rev Leeson can still be seen in the churchyard today. The memorials for Rev Kenworthy and Rev Jelly-Dudley were removed when the churchyard was remodeled.   

 1982 there was another landslip, not serious this time, just a small proportion of the retaining wall, and then in January 1983 there was another, more major landslip. This exposed he end of a large coffin and took a large section of the wall and a lot of earth into the River below.  I’d love to have seen the local paper that week!       

At that time it was also discovered that a family vault had been disturbed some years before. There were signs that the Stalybridge Body Snatchers had been at work as the coffin lids were off, some coffins were on their ends and all were empty.  However all that was in the past and the churchyard can now finally Rest in Peace and be enjoyed by all those who walk through it.    

Cocker Hill Churchyard; At Peace; May 2010

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Numbers 23 – 25 Cocker Hill are pretty special. The cottages pre-date the Industrial Revolution and are among the oldest homes remaining in Stalybridge. I have not yet managed to find out exactly when they were built; 23 and 25 are recorded as being sold in 1750 and I’m guessing the others were in existence then too.

Forty five years later in 1795 the census recorded just thirty-four houses in the whole of Stalybridge

By 1831 this had risen to 2,357 houses

23 - 31 Cocker Hill September 2009

Census Returns – Cocker Hill – 1901

Address

Nam

Relation to Head

Age Next

Occupation

23 Cocker Hill Jesse Parkside Head 56 Cotton Yarn Merchant
Sarah C Parkside Wife 56
John K Parkside Son 19 Yarn Merchants Clerk
Geo Ed Parkside Son 14
25 Cocker Hill Robert W Saxon Head 41 General Property Repairer
Mary Saxon Wife 45
Harriet Saxon Dau 7
27 Cocker Hill Joseph Grims Head 52 Fitter, Cotton Machines
Elizabeth Grims Wife 52
Sarah Anne Grims Dau 25 Worker, Cotton Mill
Percy Stanley Grims Son 20 Hanson Driver (Groom)
29 Cocker Hill Fred Sinkinson Head 25 Drapers Assistant
Bertha Sinkinson Wife 25 Overlooker, Cotton Mill
31 Cocker Hill George W Newton Head 34 Railway Agent
Elizabeth Newton Wife 31
Norman Geo Newton Son 2

Census Returns – Cocker Hill – 1891

* Note there are two separate returns for 23 Cocker Hill on the 1891 Census

Address

Name

Relation to Head

Age Next

Occupation

23 Cocker Hill* Edward Buckley Head 52 Mechanic
Betty Buckley Wife 52
James Buckley Son 23 Agent
23 Cocker Hill* James Cook Head 46 Mechanic
Eliza Ann Cook Wife 40
George Harry Cook Son 22 Mechanic
Elizabeth A Cook Dau 20 Cotton?
Roland Cook Son 18 Mechanic
Jane Cook Dau 16 Cotton yarn realer
Stanley Cook Son 15 Cotton Piecer
Edgar Cook Son 13 Cotton Piecer
Ernest Cook Son 11 Plate Printworks
Frederick Cook Son 7 Scholar
Clara Cook Dau 5 Scholar
Herbert Cook Son 2
Sarah Cook Mother 71
Hannah Cook Sister 50
25 Cocker Hill Robert W Saxon Head 31 Living on his own means
Mary Saxon Wife 31
27 Cocker Hill Jane Hawkins Head 49
John Hawkins Son 26 Blacksmiths
Harry Hawkins Son 22 Carter
George Hawkins Son 20 Steam Fitter (Apprentice)
James Hawkins Son 15 Cleaner/ locomotive
Emily Hawkins Dau 9 Scholar
Thomas Thompson Lodger 22 Corn Miller
29 Cocker Hill Alexander Robertson Head 44 Draper
Ann Robertson Wife 49
George E Petric Step Son 25 Draughtsman
Helena I Petric Step Dau 22
Richard Robertson Son 15 Clerk
Euphemia Robertson Dau 14
Alexander Robertson Son 9 Scholar
Elizabeth Dewhirst Mother in law 81
31 Cocker Hill Uninhabited

Census Returns – Cocker Hill – 1881

Address

Name

Relation to Head

Age Next

Occupation

23 Cocker Hill Dan Woffinden Head 42 Draper
Delia Woffinden Wife 40
Annie Woffinden Dau 15 Scholar
Fanny Woffinden Dau 13 Scholar
Mary Woffinden Dau 11 Scholar
Mark Woffinden Son 9 Scholar
Charlotte Woffinden Dau 7 Scholar
Delia Woffinden Dau 5 Scholar
Lucy Woffinden Dau 3 Scholar
Hannah Woffinden Dau 1
25 Cocker Hill John W Marsland Head 31 Veterinary Surgeon
Louisa Marsland Wife 31
Gertrude Marland Sister in Law 24
27 Cocker Hill James Ellis Head 64 Agent
Harriet Ellis Wife 27
Annie Ellis Dau 4
Edward Son Son 2
Roshannah Ellis Dau 11
29 Cocker Hill Charles Baker Head 45 Alderman J.P. Linen Draper
Jayne Baker Wife 47
Bertha Baker Dau 21
Mary Baker Dau 20
Kenneth Mininak Apprentice 17 Drapers Apprentice
Fredrick Cooper Apprentice 16 Drapers Apprentice
Elizabeth Potts Servant 24 Domestic Servant
Mary A James Servant 21 Domestic Servant
31 Cocker Hill John Boradill Head 60 Lodge Keeper (Cotton Mill)
Jane Boradill Wife 45 Card room Cotton Mill
Elizabeth Boradill Dau 18 Card room Cotton Mill
Annie Sugden Niece 5 Scholar

Census Returns – Cocker Hill – 1871

Address

Name

Relation to Head

Age Next

Occupation

23 Cocker Hill John Lawton Head 72 Corn Dealer
Mary Lawton Wife 72
Annie Lawton Dau 43
George Lawton Son 38 Corn Dealer
John Lawton Son 32 Bookkeeper
Margaret Lawton Dau 29
25 Cocker Hill Richard Batty Head 42 Cotton Spinner
Elizabeth Batty Wife 38 Housekeeper
John W Batty Son 13 Piecer in Cotton Mill
Harry Batty Son 11 Scholar
Edwin Batty Son 4 Scholar
Mary E Batty Dau 1
27 Cocker Hill Joseph Chadwick Head 51 Master Bobbin Turner – (Employing 9 men & 19 boys)
Grace Chadwick Wife 43 Wife
Joseph W Chadwick Son 16 Manager of Bobbin Shop
Luke Way Marsland Boarder 19 Solicitors Articled Clerk
29 Empty Uninhabited
31 Cocker Hill Joseph Conway Head 46 Manager of Cotton Mill
Jane Conway Wife 41
Mary Dean Relative 38
Elizabeth Sykes 16

Census Returns – Cocker Hill – 1861

House numbers not properly indexed – only number 31 available – others described as “Cocker Hill Brow” etc

Address

Name

Relation to Head

Age Next

Occupation

31 Cocker Hill Matthew Lawton Head 58 Painter (Mill Machinery)
Sarah Lawton Sister 62
Henry Cook Lawton Nephew 21 Assistant Pawnbroker
Charles James Buckley Nephew 28 Waste Packer

Census Returns – Cocker Hill – 1851

Address

Name

Relation to Head

Age Next

Occupation

23 Cocker Hill Edward Hunt Head 22 Cotton Spinner
Sarah Hunt Wife 30
25 Cocker Hill John (?Hatherford) Head 29 Tailor
Mary (?Hatherford) Wife 24
27 Cocker Hill Henry Heap Head 48 Auctioneer & Agent
Betty Heap Wife 48
Robert Heap Son 24 Auctioneer & Agent Assistant
Ann Heap Dau 22 Dress Maker
Edward Heap Son 21 Druggist Assistant
29 Cocker Hill Joseph Worsnip Head 33 Mechanic
Sarah Worsnip Wife 33
Ann Worsnip Dau 9 Scholar
James Worsnip Son 4 Scholar
Richard Worsnip Son 2
(Hamilton) Worsnip Son 1
31 Cocker Hill James Sidebottom Head 26 Cotton Masters Son
Margaret Sidebottom Wife 22
Mary A Wilkin Servant 24 House Servant

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